Gallery

Cisco launches router , switch for smart grids

This gallery contains 2 photos.

The networking giant plans to release two pieces of equipment–a router and a network switch–aimed at helping utilities create better communication systems designed not only to help automate electrical substations, but someday connect “smart meters” in homes and variable sources … Continue reading

SmartMeters for your home

Agilewaves constantly monitors electric, gas and water use and provides accurate consumption and carbon footprint information in real-time, from any web enabled device, from anywhere in the world. The system intelligence can send automatic notifications of leaks, excessive energy use or carbon emissions via email or text messaging, and can seamlessly communicate with home control systems.

measuring the ecological footprint of a property in real-time, the technology can monitor each individual circuit, water line, and gas appliance. The flexible system can also track other factors such as temperature/humidity, output from solar PV, performance of solar or geo-thermal water heating, indoor air quality and even living architecture. Current and historical information is automatically stored allowing powerful trend analysis and comparative features to be easily displayed across any time period. The system, custom-designed for larger buildings and higher-end homes, needs to be installed by an electrician and can also be used to dim lights, turn on and off heating and cooling, and adjust smart appliances.

What’s included on the system?

A basic system is turn-key and includes all the associated sensors, hardware and pre-configured software to monitor main water, main gas, and main electric plus 7 additional individual circuits of your choice (equipment, appliances, lights, sub-panels, etc). This is a suggested system starting point only and the system can easily be refined to monitor additional electric, gas or water points of use, as well as indoor air quality, solar, geo-thermal, green living roofs, climate and more

how is it installed?

Sensors are mounted and wired back to an Agilewaves Sensor Integration Panel (ASIP). The electrical sensors mount directly in the circuit breaker panel(s), so do not require invasive installation within the home or building. The gas, water and other sensors are installed at their monitoring point and wired back to the nearest ASIP. In some cases, Agilewaves may be able to gather data from existing “communicating” utility meters or equipment, avoiding the need for additional sensors. Wireless is an option, but only used as a last resort.Agilewaves can communicate with smart meters also.

visit Agilewaves at http://www.agilewaves.com/ to learn about prices and how to order it.

Smart Grid

Do you know about Smart Grid?

The electric grid delivers electricity from points of generation to consumers, and the electricity delivery network functions via two primary systems: the transmission system and the distribution system. The transmission system delivers electricity from power plants to distribution substations, while the distribution system delivers electricity from distribution substations to consumers. The grid also encompasses myriads of local area networks that use distributed energy resources to serve local loads and/or to meet specific application requirements for remote power, village or district power, premium power, and critical loads protection.

A smart grid includes an intelligent monitoring system that keeps track of all electricity flowing in the system. It also incorporates the use of superconductive transmission lines for less power loss, as well as the capability of integrating alternative sources of electricity such as solar and wind. When power is least expensive a smart grid could turn on selected home appliances such as washing machines or factory processes that can run at arbitrary hours. At peak times it could turn off selected appliances to reduce demand.

In the US, the city of Austin, Texas has been working on building its smart grid since 2003, when its utility first replaced 1/3 of its manual meters with smart meters that communicate via a wireless mesh network. It currently manages 200,000 devices real-time (smart meters, smart thermostats, and sensors across its service area), and expects to be supporting 500,000 devices real-time in 2009 servicing 1 million consumers and 43,000 businesses. Boulder, Colorado completed the first phase of its smart grid project in August 2008. Both systems use the smart meter as a gateway to the home automation network (HAN) that controls smart sockets and devices. Some HAN designers favor decoupling control functions from the meter, out of concern of future mismatches with new standards and technologies available from the fast moving business segment of home electronic devices.

Hydro One, in Ontario, Canada is in the midst of a large-scale Smart Grid initiative, deploying a standards-compliant communications infrastructure from Trilliant. By the end of 2010, the system will serve 1.3 million customers in the province of Ontario. The initiative won the “Best AMR Initiative in North America” award from the Utility Planning Network.

A smart grid architecture relies on technologies of design and procurement to manage an energy system and automatically track usage. The U.S. Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provide financial incentives to utilities and enterprises to encourage the development of capabilities that make the use of electricity more efficient and greener.

The electrical grid, which includes electric generation, transmission, distribution and electricity use, is the major contributor of pollution in North America. Production of electricity emits greenhouse gases into the environment, thus contributing heavily to global warming. Many countries, including the United States, are in the process of developing standards to produce clean energy.

By going green using an automated, digital grid, countries can reduce pollution with a more efficient operation. Among the benefits are reduced costs, energy savings, enhanced reliability, more efficient demand response, and the ability to use renewable energy. According to a study by the U.S. Department of Energy, the modernization of electrical grids in the country with smart technology would save between $46 billion and $117 billion over the next 20 years.

Smart grid architecture helps companies and other enterprises become more energy efficient by enabling interaction throughout the entire infrastructure, including electric generation, delivery and consumption components. Energy management software is the key to saving energy and reducing costs because it automatically monitors real time energy use, weather data, and other critical systems across the entire enterprise. This smart technology enables businesses to procure the best energy rates for their sites.

FOR MORE INFO CLICK HERE and HERE

and  for a graphical explanation…click here and some very interesting links:

http://www.oe.energy.gov/SmartGridIntroduction.htmv